Remembering Corinth, Part 3, Geography Lesson

DFH Volume Issue 12

Remembering Corinth, by Dave Hayes, is a ten-part series about Dave’s remembrances of Corinth in the late ‘50s.  Dave, a retired elementary teacher and guidance counselor (36 years), and part time adjunct professor in the Counseling Dept. at nearby West Chester Univ. (24 years-8 after his “first” retirement) lives in Pottstown, PA.  He and his wife, Kathleen, had four children, Heather, Jeremy, Emily (d.2008) and Benjamin.  He descends from Wilber Sr. as follows: Wilber Sr., Rev. Charles “Chop” Dayton, Isabelle “Izzie” [Dayton] Hayes, David Hayes.

Speaking of geographical influences, here’s a story that involved my brother Keith and me and reminded us that not all areas of the country observe the same customs.  In Texas, where there wasn’t much rain, when it did come it was fast and furious with lots of run-off.  There weren’t a lot of swimming pools in the neighborhood in the late 50’s so

A close up of clouds in the sky

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when it started raining all the kids would run inside, change into their swim suits then lie in the gutters beside the streets to pick up the rain water that would pour over them.  Being on a hill was the best way to experience the rushing water flowing over you.  Great fun, eh?  Well, apparently that’s only in Texas because when it started raining in Corinth that first summer, Keith & I ran in to get into our swim suits and proceeded to get into the gutter.  Our friends stared at us as we tried to explain what we were doing.  They thought we were crazy, so we climbed out and slinked inside to change.  Lesson learned: what they do in Texas, they might not do in New York. In our nomadic experience, we learned to use our pertinent geographical

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